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The sippy cup and your child's teeth!

Important information about the sippy cups , article provided by the American Dental Association  Training Cups and Your Toddler’s Teeth It’s a milestone worthy of celebration: your baby is graduating from bottles! According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, your toddler should be ready to move on from the breast or bottle between 12 and 24 months.

While your child may not be ready for a regular cup right away, there are a number of training cups you can use to help them move from baby to big kid. Here are three things to consider.
What Type of Training Cup to UseWhile it’s tempting to purchase a “no spill” cup, these are essentially baby bottles with a different design.  The aim is to shift from sucking to sipping.  No-spill cups have a valve that stops spills and the only way your child can drink from a no-spill cup is to suck, not sip.

To help your child learn how to sip, look for training cups with the following: 
A cup with a snap-on or screw-on lid that has a spout, but no va…

The Importance of the “First Dental Home” Program

The Importance of the “First Dental Home” Program

We will address the issue related to the Dental Home Program established by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAPD) to move forward on the goal of achieving an optimal oral health and life quality of the population, ensuring dental services for every child up to three (3) years of age, including those with special needs and for those who are unattended, who require such care, regardless of their economic and social status. The reason for the existence of the Dental Home is because it has been statistically shown that tooth decay is the most common chronic disease in children, reaching up to more than 60% of cases before the age of five. That is, sixty (60) of every hundred (100) children suffer from this disease in their primary teeth. It has also been noted the increase of tooth decay in older children, since according to statistics, in children from 11 to 17 years this present up to 90% of tooth decay in permanent teeth.
What is the …